Physics 202 - General Physics II

Fall 2005

Introduction to

Electricity and Magnetism,

Light and Sound

primarily for students majoring in engineering

 Last Updated:   8 December 2005  PT

 

World Year of Physics 2005

Goals:

Physics 202 is the second semester of a 2-semester introduction to physics that is designed mainly for engineering students. The main topics are electricity, magnetism, light, optics, and sound. There are two lectures, two discussions and one three-hour lab per week. Our goal is to help you develop an understanding and intuition for physics so that you can solve practical problems.  The only way to accomplish this goal is by thinking about and solving lots of problems and experimenting in the lab. We hope that Physics 202 will develop the critical thinking and collaborative skills you will need in your future career.

 

Administrative announcements about the course, examinations, etc., will be made in lecture and will sometimes be sent out by email. All course information is also available on the course home page (this document) at http://uw.physics.wisc.edu/phys202/. Watch for updates!  All grades will be posted at the Learn @ UW site: http://uwmad.courses.wisconsin.edu/

Prerequisites: Physics 201 or equivalent.

Materials Needed:

Other material (not required):

Lectures:

Tu & Th    1:20 -- 2:10 PM and 2:25 -- 3:15 PM in 2103 Chamberlin Hall (Rennebohm Auditorium).  The two lectures on each day are the same;  you can attend either one.

The lectures supplement, but do not substitute for, reading and studying the text.  You are responsible for all the material in the weekly reading assignments and we expect you to do the assigned reading before coming to lecture. We encourage questions, but realize you may feel intimidated by the large class. Ask them anyway! Lectures will be given by:

 

Prof. Albrecht Karle (4215 Chamberlin Hall, 262-3945, karle@amanda.wisc.edu)

Prof. Peter Timbie (6209 Chamberlin Hall, 262-5916, pttimbie@wisc.edu)

 

There are special lectures on Fridays at 12:05 – 12:55 in 2103 Chamberlin Hall for Honors students (who are required to attend).  Everyone else is encouraged to attend.   These talks are about applications of physics to topics ranging from astrophysics to fusion energy to biology. The schedule will be announced in class.

Reading Quizzes:

It is essential for you to read the textbook before coming to class.  To help you keep up to speed we will have on-line reading quizzes periodically throughout the semester.  The quizzes will give you bonus points that count toward your course grade (see “Grading” below). 

Laboratory:

The weekly laboratory exercises are 3 hours long.  We meet in 3310 and 3314 Chamberlin Hall.  Follow the "General Instructions" in the laboratory manual (pages 5-15).  Information about the laboratories is also found on http://badger.physics.wisc.edu/lab/manual2/ .  You will work in groups of 3 students.  Groups will be chosen by your TA and will be changed every few weeks. You will write up your observations and results during the laboratory period in the lab notebook. The lab notebook is not to be taken from the laboratory. YOU MUST COMPLETE AT LEAST 10 OF THE 11 LABORATORY ASSIGNMENTS IN ORDER TO RECEIVE CREDIT FOR THE COURSE. You must get written permission from only your lab TA to take a make-up lab. Make-up time is given for the labs covered in each exam period during the week of the exam only (i.e. you can’t make up a lab from September in December).  Each lab will be preceded by a “Prelab Quiz” to be handed in before starting the lab.  The quiz questions are posted on the course schedule below.  Your TA has two options each week for grading your labs – 1) by giving a “Postlab Quiz” during lab time or 2) by examining your write-up in your lab book.

Homework:

The homework problems are assigned in the syllabus for each week and are due by 4 PM on Wednesday of the week after the homework is assigned.   There are mailboxes outside Rm 2103 CH for you to drop off your work. Homework will count toward your grade;  your TA will grade one of the problems each week in detail and account for the completeness of your work as well.  Feel free to discuss homework with others. The solutions will be explained in discussion section and available on http://physics.library.wisc.edu/reserves/202.htm shortly after homework is handed in. There are also resources available on the Text Publisher Web Page,. Homework assigned for the week of an exam is not to be handed in for grading. 

Study Skills:

It is difficult to learn physics without asking lots of questions. The more active you are, the easier it will become. We have tried to offer as many ways as possible for you to take an active role in the course: discussion sections, office hours, email, labs, etc. Never be shy about asking a question! Chances are half the class has the same one. A colleague of ours says “To have a question can seem like a shame for a moment, but not asking is a shame for a lifetime.”We strongly recommend studying with other students in the class. Be sure you can completely solve all the exercises in the main textbook as well as the assigned homework.

Discussion Sections:

Your discussion sections and lab are taught by Graduate Teaching Assistants who have a lot of experience with physics. You will spend at least 5 hours a week with your TA -- take advantage of every moment! There are two discussion periods each week and you are expected to attend both.  Discussions will be devoted to answering your questions about homework and working in small groups on extra problems.    As with lab, your TA will assign you to a group of 3 students and will change the makeup of the groups every few weeks.  The problems will be somewhat different from regular homework problems;  some will be conceptual (few numbers to plug in) and others will involve applying physics problem-solving to realistic situations. Your group will hand in your solutions each session for grading.

Office Hours

Prof. Karle:  Wednesdays 1:20 – 2:10 and Fridays 11:00 – 11:50  in 4104 Chamberlin Hall.

Prof. Timbie:  Mondays 1:20 - 2:10 and Wednesdays 9:55 – 10:45  in 6209 Chamberlin Hall. 

Please feel free to drop in to talk about anything.  You may also make an appointment for other times.

The teaching assistants have office hours in the consultation room (2307 Chamberlin Hall). You may go to the office hours of any TA.  Your TAs are very busy with classes and have research obligations of their own so please be respectful of their time.

Honors Credit:

The course may be taken for honors credit. Honors students are required to attend regularly an additional lecture on Fridays at 12:05 PM in 2103 Chamberlin Hall. 

Examinations:

DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE IF YOU ARE NOT SURE THAT YOU WILL BE ABLE TO ATTEND ALL EXAMS (i.e. do not take a course that meets or has exams on Mondays, October 3, October 31, or November 21, at 5:45 – 7:15 PM or a final at 7:45 AM on Tuesday December 20). Makeup exams will not be given. The average of the other hour exam scores will be substituted for the missing exam, provided you have a written excuse from a physician, dean, or academic advisor only. There will be three one-hour exams on the dates shown. Click here for details. Physics is not about memorization so we don’t want you wasting your time memorizing equations for exams;  you may bring one 5 in x 8 in card (crib sheet) to each exam.  For the final, you may bring your 3 cards from the first three exams, plus one more 5 in x 8 in card for a total of 4 cards, both sides each.  Or, you may bring 2 sheets of 8.5 in x 11 in paper, both sides each.  You may find that preparing these sheets will help you review what you’ve learned.  We strongly encourage consulting the sample exams on http://physics.library.wisc.edu/reserves/202.htm. Exams questions will be of four types:

·       conceptual (similar to questions asked in lecture and worked in discussion)

·       homework (similar to hw problems)

·       laboratory (related to the labs)

·       context-rich (similar to discussion problems)

Grading:

All your grades will be recorded and visible to you at the Learn @ UW site for Physics 202.  Grades will be assigned according to the point scheme below.   We will be using an “absolute” grading scheme – there will be no “curving” of grades.  So in principle everyone in the class could get an “A”.

 

Exam 1

 

 100 pts

Exam 2

 

 100 pts

Exam 3

 

 100 pts

Final Exam

 

 200 pts

Homework

best 10 wks x 10 pts

  100 pts

Discussion Problems

best  20 x 3 pts

60 pts

Discussion Participation

 

   30 pts

Lab (prelab and postlab quizzes and notebooks)

11 wks x 10 pts

 110 pts

Total

 

 800 pts

 

Letter Grades

 

 

A

is 90 % or more =

720 pts

AB

Is 80 % or more =

640 pts

B

Is 70 % or more =

560 pts

BC

Is 60 % or more =

480 pts

C

Is 50 % or more =

400 pts

D

Is 40 % or more =

320 pts

 

Reading Quizzes:  There will be about 10 reading quizzes that will be worth 1 “bonus” pt each.

 

Feedback:

We want Physics 202 to be the best learning experience you have at UW-Madison.  Please feel free to offer suggestions (by email or office hours or even by an anonymous note) to any of the teaching staff.   All teaching staff have mailboxes on the ssecond floor of Chamberlin Hall. 


Physics 202 Course Schedule

Week

  Date (2005)

 

Chapter 

Homework

Lab 

T

Sept. 6

 

Chap 23 Electric Fields 

8,15,20,26,30

No Lab 

 

R

8

 

Chap 23 Electric Fields

38,44,49,54,57

 

T

13

 

Chap 24 Gauss’ Law

4,8,12,24,26,41,58,62

E-1, part I, Prelab_E1_I

 

R

15

 

Chap 25 Electric Potential

4,6

 

T

20

 

Chap 25 Electric Potential

8,18,20,37,42,50,52

E-1, part II, Prelab_E1_II

 

R

22

 

Chap 26 Capacitance and Dielectrics

5,14,29

 

T

27

 

Chap 26 Capacitance and Dielectrics

31,38,43,61

E2, Prelab_E2

 

R

29

 

Chap 27 Current and Resistance

11,14,16,42,43,44 

 

5 

M

Oct. 3

 

EXAM I: 5:45 PM  (Ch. 23 - 26.3)

 

 

 

T

4

 

Chap 28 Direct Current Circuits

2,6,14,20,27

Make-up

 

R

 6

 

Chap 28 Direct Current Circuits

32,36,42,50,64

 

T

11

 

Chap 29 Magnetic Fields

8,10,14,27,34,41,48,55

EC-3, Prelab EC-3

   

R

13

 

Chap 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field

1,20

 

T

18

 

Chap 30 Sources of the Magnetic Field

26,33,38,40,51

E-4

 

R

20

 

Chap 31 Faraday’s Law

2,9,20,28,58

 

8

T

25

 

Chap 31, 32 Inductance

(31)-31,41

EC-5

 

R

27

 

Chap 32 Inductance

4,6,22,36,38,39,51,54

 

9 

M

31

 

EXAM II: 5:45 PM  (Ch. 26.4 - 30)

 

 

 

T

Nov. 1

 

Chap 33 Alternating Current Circuits

10,15,21,26,32

Make-up 

 

R

3

 

Chap 33 Alternating Current Circuits

40,46,54,56,62

 

10 

T

8

 

Chap 16 Wave Motion

18,19,22,34,44

E-6, Prelab E6

 

R

10

 

Chap 18 Superposition and Standing Waves

8,14,21,38,52,58

 

11 

T

15

 

Chap 34 Electromagnetic Waves

4,24,30,37

E-7

 

R

17

 

Chap 34 Electromagnetic Waves

33,42,61

 

12 

M

21

 

EXAM III: 5:45 PM  (Ch. 31-33, 16, 18)

 

 

 

T

22

 

Chap 35 Light and Geometrical Optics

2,15,18,29,30,40,41, and S1, S2

Make-up

 

R

24

 

THANKSGIVING RECESS

 

 

 13 

T

29

 

Chap 36 Image Formation

2,12,18,27,34,40

SC-1 , S-2

 

R

Dec. 1

 

Chap 36 Image Formation

48,51,56 and S1

 

14 

T

6

 

Chap 37 Interference of Light Waves

1,16,26,40,52,54

 LC-2 and part of L-3, Prelab LC-2

 

R

8

 

Chap 40 Quantum Physics (reading on reserve)

2,8,14,24,32,34,47,51

 

 

15 

T

13

 

Chap 40 Quantum Physics (reading on reserve)

 

 LC-1, Prelab LC-1

 

R

15

 

 Review 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

20

 

FINAL: 7:45 AM  (Ch. 16,18, 23-37, 40)

 

 

 

Tutoring:

 

If you are having trouble with the course, don't despair!  Most students find this class very challenging. Be sure you take advantage of the office hours that the TA's and Professor have.  You might also want to try a tutor.  There are several possibilities:

 

1. The University Physical Society  (UW Physics Club) offers free tutoring on a drop-in basis in their clubroom in 2328 Chamberlin  Hall. 

2. The Department of Physics main office maintains a list of Physics graduate students who offer tutoring for an hourly fee.   

3. The Greater University Tutoring Service (GUTS Tutorial) offers free tutoring.  Their office is 302A Union South. 

Also,

4. The Academics Affairs Office in the College of Engineering will continue to offer the Supplementary Instruction (SI) Program for Math 234, Physics 201 and 202. Students who choose to participate in a supplementary session will be asked to commit to attending the session throughout the semester. The sessions will be facilitated by upper-class engineering students.  The supplementary instruction sessions will be held in the renovated group study area on the 4th floor of the Engineering Library (Wendt Library). There will be three supplementary sessions offered for Math 234, one for Physics 201, and two for Physics 202, with a limit of 15 students in each session. Each session will meet twice a week for 50 minutes. These supplementary sessions are available to you regardless of whether you have an engineering classification.

 

Study Groups:

 

We strongly encourage you to work with other students in the class.  You can save time on hard homework problems and you will learn the subject better by discussing it with others.

General Advice:

Physics is not something you read and memorize, rather it is something you learn how to do . Try the following study procedure:

  1. Read the chapter prior to lecture, so that you will know what it's about.
  2. Listen carefully to the lecture and take notes
  3. This is crucial: Do not go back and read and re-read the chapter until you "understand it."  Rather, start working problems, going back through the chapter to clarify points as they come up.  Discuss the problem with your TA or with other students. 

Questions and concerns:

If you have a documented disability (e.g. McBurney Students) and wish to discuss academic accommodations, please contact one of the instructors as soon as possible.

If you have a non-subject-matter question or concern that cannot be resolved by your TA or professor, contact the Instructional Program Manager, Ms. M. A. Clarke (Department Office, 262-2629, mailto:maclarke@wisc.edu).

 

Other Links:

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